A Misc. of Horrors




A miscellaneous gathering of the paranormal, legends, superstitions and all over strange topics.

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doitlikeadog:

Aokigahara (青木ヶ原?). There are over 100 dead bodies found in the Aokigahara in Japan every year. It’s known as the place where most suicides, after the Golden Gate Bridge, take place. You can wander around and suddenly come across rotten bodies, guns, razor blades, suicide letters nailed on trees. A sign at the forests entry tries to hold people back,”mind your children, mind your parents,talk about your pain”,a phone number of a suicide hotline under it. Even children were found dead in the Forest. Old cars are standing in front of the forest, broken bicycles. There are tents with dead bodies, arms, legs, even eyes in them lying around. A haunting, but fascinating Place.

(Source: theres-no-need, via blacklungdisease)


staplestable:



This is the Buckley Family. The children’s names were Susan and John. As a Halloween joke, all the kids in the neighborhood were going to get a dummy and pretend to chop its head off. The Buckley children thought it would be hilarious to actually murder their mother, so when the kids walked up the the door, they got an axe and slaughtered her. Once everyone figured out what they had really done, they called the police, but the kids were long gone by then. The only picture of them was this photo, taken by a trick or treater. The mothers body was later found half eaten.

staplestable:

This is the Buckley Family. The children’s names were Susan and John. As a Halloween joke, all the kids in the neighborhood were going to get a dummy and pretend to chop its head off. The Buckley children thought it would be hilarious to actually murder their mother, so when the kids walked up the the door, they got an axe and slaughtered her. Once everyone figured out what they had really done, they called the police, but the kids were long gone by then. The only picture of them was this photo, taken by a trick or treater. The mothers body was later found half eaten.

(via pandalollipop)



(Source: littlecreepythings, via creepylittleworld)

450 notes
Tagged as: rhymes, creepy,



“Investigators found an extremely cold and bloody crime scene. The living room carpet was so drenched with blood that it pooled on the wood planks underneath; the oozing blood formed crimson colored icicles where it leaked through the cabin floorboards.”

“Investigators found an extremely cold and bloody crime scene. The living room carpet was so drenched with blood that it pooled on the wood planks underneath; the oozing blood formed crimson colored icicles where it leaked through the cabin floorboards.”

(Source: theroyaltenenblarghs, via bobbimorsebarton)



skinned-teen:

The Kiss (Le Baiser), New Mexico, 1982, is an image of a single autopsied head that’s been sliced in half down the middle, and posed as two separate beings locked in a kiss.

skinned-teen:

The Kiss (Le Baiser), New Mexico, 1982, is an image of a single autopsied head that’s been sliced in half down the middle, and posed as two separate beings locked in a kiss.

(Source: untitled-projects, via amelianicoleheffern)




ramirezdahmerbundy:

Mt. Everest has around 200 dead bodies on the mountain. It is nearly impossible for recovery of a body off the mountain. The “death zone” is 26,000 feet. The air there is so thin. Lack of oxygen leaves climber bewildered and weak and can cause them to pass out and get frostbite. Many people lose their lives here. The bodies are left the same as how they died and have even become landmarks for other travellers. The photograph shows a body which has been given the name “green boots” and has been there since 1996.

(via princessofwonderrland)



Tokoloshe

The Tokoloshe has acquired quite a lot of fame in Africa and most of us living here will be familiar with it, especially in Southern Africa.  The Tokoloshe resembles a zombie, poltergeist, or gremlin, created by South African shamans who have been offended by someone.  The tokoloshe may also wander, causing mischief wherever it goes, particularly to schoolchildren.  The Tokoloshe, according to the Zulu shaman Credo Mutwa, has been known to take on many forms.  One form is as a dwarf-like gremlin, but others have portrayed the Tokoloshe as being a bear-like humanoid being.

The Tokoloshe is a mischievous and evil spirit that can become invisible by swallowing a pebble.  Tokoloshes are called upon by malevolent people to cause trouble for others.  At it’s least harmful a tokoloshe can be used to scare children, but it’s power extends to causing illness and even death upon the victim.  The penis of the tokoloshe is so long that it has to be slung over his shoulder.  Thus sexually well-endowed, the duties of the tokoloshe include making love to its witch mistress.  In return, it is rewarded with milk and food.  In common with European myths and legends concerning familiars, salt must not be added to food offerings for tokoloshes.  The witch keeps the tokoloshe docile by cutting the fringe of hair that hangs over its eyes.

In South Africa, where many white families had maidservants, the maids would often raise their beds by placing the legs of their beds on bricks.  It was an almost universal belief, among white people, that this was to keep the occupant of the bed out of reach of the tokoloshe.  The way to get rid of him is to call in the n’anga or witch-doctor who has the power to banish him from the area.

(Source: roadtravelafrica.com)



What would you do for love?
In her time, Jean Carroll was a popular bearded lady. More  importantly, Carroll was the real deal. Born in 1910 in Schenectady, New  York Jean Carroll possessed the genuine foundation of a fine silken  beard at the age of ten, when she joined the Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus.  As she aged, that foundation of follicles flourished and soon provided  Carroll with a stable career in carnival exhibition.
As a young lady Carroll met a charming young Ohio man and quickly  fell in love. The object of her affection was John Carson. Carson was a  charming and handsome man. He was a contortionist and sideshow talker  and he was actually quite taken by the sweet-hearted bearded girl. He  was certainly attracted to Carroll but the beard was simply too much for  him to overcome. While he continued to be friendly with Carroll, he  pushed aside any romantic aspirations and focused on friendship.

For fifteen years the two saw each other almost daily. As Carson got  to know Carroll for the woman she was, behind the whiskers, he fell  deeply in love with her. Carroll saw that love in him and it pained her.  She knew he would never be able to accept the beard and she, in turn,  could not give up her source of livelihood and her home in the carnival. As she cried one night, sword swallower Alec Linton suggested a painful solution.
“Shave the beard and become a tattooed woman.”
Soon, the beard was gone and in its place were over 700 intricate  designs by famed tattooist Charlie Wagner. The pain involved in the  process was likely excruciating but the investment was wise. John Carson  was completely smitten, apparently having no problems with illustration  over facial hair, and the two wed almost immediately following the  ‘close shave’.
They remained with the carnival. John continued on in his old job as a  charming sideshow talker and Jean Carroll exhibited her new tattoos  quite thoroughly, as a burlesque dancer.
The two remained inseparable until John’s passing in 1951

What would you do for love?

In her time, Jean Carroll was a popular bearded lady. More importantly, Carroll was the real deal. Born in 1910 in Schenectady, New York Jean Carroll possessed the genuine foundation of a fine silken beard at the age of ten, when she joined the Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus. As she aged, that foundation of follicles flourished and soon provided Carroll with a stable career in carnival exhibition.

As a young lady Carroll met a charming young Ohio man and quickly fell in love. The object of her affection was John Carson. Carson was a charming and handsome man. He was a contortionist and sideshow talker and he was actually quite taken by the sweet-hearted bearded girl. He was certainly attracted to Carroll but the beard was simply too much for him to overcome. While he continued to be friendly with Carroll, he pushed aside any romantic aspirations and focused on friendship.

For fifteen years the two saw each other almost daily. As Carson got to know Carroll for the woman she was, behind the whiskers, he fell deeply in love with her. Carroll saw that love in him and it pained her. She knew he would never be able to accept the beard and she, in turn, could not give up her source of livelihood and her home in the carnival. As she cried one night, sword swallower Alec Linton suggested a painful solution.

“Shave the beard and become a tattooed woman.”

Soon, the beard was gone and in its place were over 700 intricate designs by famed tattooist Charlie Wagner. The pain involved in the process was likely excruciating but the investment was wise. John Carson was completely smitten, apparently having no problems with illustration over facial hair, and the two wed almost immediately following the ‘close shave’.

They remained with the carnival. John continued on in his old job as a charming sideshow talker and Jean Carroll exhibited her new tattoos quite thoroughly, as a burlesque dancer.

The two remained inseparable until John’s passing in 1951




Ningyo: the Japanese Mermaid

As a nation surrounded by the sea, it is perhaps no surprise that Japan too has its own long tradition of mermaids. These creatures are known to the Japanese as ningyo (人魚), literally “human fish,” as well as gyojin (魚人), “fish human,” and hangyo-jin, (半魚人)or “half-fish human.”

Physical descriptions of Japanese mermaids vary, however they generally differ in appearance from the typical image of the beautiful maiden torsos with fish tails common to traditional European mermaid lore. Before the influence of foreign lore somewhat changed the image of mermaids in Japan, the Japanese ningyo had little in common with their Western counterparts.

Although they were often described as having full heads of hair, the ningyo were typically depicted as more bestial and grotesque looking than the European variety, with an appearance more like a cross between a fish and a monkey than that of a beautiful woman. Often the mermaids had barely human scaly arms ending in claws. In many local traditions, these Japanese mermaids had no appendages, and were often said to be just a humanoid head upon a fish body instead of possessing full human torso. The heads were sometimes depicted as being horned, or possessing prominent fangs. Some stories tell of a more relatively normal looking human head, only attached directly to a full fish body. In some traditions, the mermaids retained a form reminiscent of the more familiar version of mermaids, but with a more demonic appearance or having distorted features. Japanese mermaids were sometimes said to have alabaster white skin and high, musical voices that sounded like a skylark or flute.

Many mystical qualities were attributed to the mermaids of Japan. The ningyo were believed to cry tears of pearl, and it was thought that eternal youth and beauty would be imparted upon any human being who consumed a mermaid’s flesh. Many legends tell of women eating the flesh of a ningyo and miraculously ceasing to age, or reverting to a younger, more beautiful form. Like many Japanese folkloric animals, merfolk were also said to have shape-shifting abilities. Mermaids taking on the form of human beings or other creatures are often mentioned in much folklore concerning the creatures. For instance, in the 1870s lighthouse keepers at the Cape Nosaapu Lighthouse in northeast Hokkaido believed that mermaids could turn into deadly jellyfish. These mermaids were thought to masquerade as beautiful, kimono clad women on shore that would lure men into the sea, upon which they would transform into giant jelly fish and kill anyone foolish enough to have gone for a swim with them.

(Source: cryptomundo.com)


paranormalnight:

The story states that the White Witch was Annie Palmer, who was born in Haiti. She later moved to Jamaica, where she was married to John Palmer in 1820. As an adult, she reportedly stood 4’11”.
John was the owner of Rose Hall Plantation, east of Montego Bay. Annie’s husband (and two subsequent husbands as well) died suspiciously, and it is speculated that Annie herself brought about their demise. Annie became known as a mistress of voodoo, using it to terrorize the plantation, and taking male slaves into her bed at night and often murdering them.
She is also supposed to have dispatched her lovers allegedly because she was bored of them. Assuming this is true it would make Annie an extreme example of a clinical psychopath although the stories are speculation at best. The legend has her being murdered in her bed during the slave uprisings of the 1830s by one of her slave lovers.Rose Hall is widely regarded to be a visually impressive house and the most famous of the Great Houses in Jamaica. It is a Georgian mansion with a stone base and a plastered upper story, high on the hillside, with a panorama view over the coast. Built in the 1770s, Rose Hall was restored in the 1960s to its former splendor, with mahogany floors, interior windows and doorways, paneling and wooden ceilings. It is decorated with silk wallpaper printed with palms and birds, ornamented with chandeliers and furnished with mostly European antiques. There is a bar downstairs and a restaurant. Presently, Rose Hall is a museum for tourists who wish to see where Annie Palmer ate, slept and also areas of the house where she is said to haunt. Possible areas where the murders took place, e.g in her bedroom where she suffocated one of her lovers with a pillow. But the investigators of Ghost Hunters International did not find any paranormal clues.

paranormalnight:

The story states that the White Witch was Annie Palmer, who was born in Haiti. She later moved to Jamaica, where she was married to John Palmer in 1820. As an adult, she reportedly stood 4’11”.

John was the owner of Rose Hall Plantation, east of Montego Bay. Annie’s husband (and two subsequent husbands as well) died suspiciously, and it is speculated that Annie herself brought about their demise. Annie became known as a mistress of voodoo, using it to terrorize the plantation, and taking male slaves into her bed at night and often murdering them.

She is also supposed to have dispatched her lovers allegedly because she was bored of them. Assuming this is true it would make Annie an extreme example of a clinical psychopath although the stories are speculation at best. The legend has her being murdered in her bed during the slave uprisings of the 1830s by one of her slave lovers.Rose Hall is widely regarded to be a visually impressive house and the most famous of the Great Houses in Jamaica. It is a Georgian mansion with a stone base and a plastered upper story, high on the hillside, with a panorama view over the coast. Built in the 1770s, Rose Hall was restored in the 1960s to its former splendor, with mahogany floors, interior windows and doorways, paneling and wooden ceilings. It is decorated with silk wallpaper printed with palms and birds, ornamented with chandeliers and furnished with mostly European antiques. There is a bar downstairs and a restaurant. Presently, Rose Hall is a museum for tourists who wish to see where Annie Palmer ate, slept and also areas of the house where she is said to haunt. Possible areas where the murders took place, e.g in her bedroom where she suffocated one of her lovers with a pillow. But the investigators of Ghost Hunters International did not find any paranormal clues.

(via midnightnightmare)